Archbishop tells York to back its football team

Published 09 May 2009
The Archbishop of York has called on the people of York to get behind the city’s football club in its bid for the FA Trophy on Saturday.

York City is hoping to make up for a poor league season by scooping the title in its match against Stevenage Borough at Wembley.

“Saturday is a big day not only for the team but also for the city of York,” said Archbishop John Sentamu. “I’m urging everyone in the city to get behind our team and cheer them on. It doesn’t matter if you watch the game at Wembley in London or Westfield in York, let’s get behind the team.”

Dr Sentamu is patron of York City. He joined the players at their team hotel on Friday night before seeing them off on the coach to Wembley and boarding a flight to Toronto where he is speaking this weekend at a conference.

He expressed his regret at missing his team’s game.

“Obviously I’m totally gutted that I won’t be at Wembley on Saturday. I’ll never forget celebrating on the pitch with the players and the directors at Kit Kat crescent after the second leg of the semi-final,” he said.

“But I agreed to be in Toronto over 18 months ago and although I’ve tried to re-arrange my travel to make sure I was at the game, there is no way of being in two places at once.

“Make no mistake that I’ll be following the game and I’ll be sure to shout a ‘Come on City! Come on You Minstermen!’ as my plane flies over London during the second half of the match.”

Saturday’s match is only York City’s second in Wembley in 87 years and its first since 1993 when the team beat Crewe in a penalty shoot-out in the Division 3 play-off final.

The Archbishop added: “I would urge anyone who can to get down to the game. It’s going to be the kind of day families will tell each about for years to come.”

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