The Ten Commandments: Are they still relevant?

Judaism is founded on them, Christianity holds them close to its heart and Islam rates them highly. But do the Ten Commandments still have any real significance for us today? Do they still count? Do they matter? And could following them do us any good at all?

Author, evangelist and one of the most gifted Christian communicators of his generation, J John believes he has the answer. Are the Ten Commandments still relevant? Absolutely.

In his book ‘Ten: Laws of Love Set in Stone’ J.John explores the possibilities of a world where love guides every action, where communities place others before themselves and where the ancient commandments are as relevant today as they were to a collection of political refugees wandering in the desert.

And it works.

Ten has become a significant success since it was first published in 2009. Accompanying it today is just10, a ten-week course that has been adopted by churches worldwide and which, this autumn, will be run in 400 churches, with a total audience of over one million.

In – and out of – churches worldwide, those who read Ten or who put on the just10 course find that God’s basic, ancient instructions map out a clear course to freedom. The original words delivered to Moses might well include donkeys, murder, slaves and Sabbaths, but they combine to offer a blueprint for a life less fragile – and less ordinary – in the midst of the chaos and celebration of the 21st century.

And when the government is turning the spotlight back on the public in order to build up society and strengthen communities, books like Ten speak louder than ever.

J John is the author of 21 books, with over 1 million copies in print. A popular speaker, John has ministered in 54 countries on six continents. His passion is to connect people with their heavenly Father, and present a faith that is relevant for today. John, his wife Killy, and their three sons reside in Chorleywood, Hertfordshire in the United Kingdom.

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