25 UK schools investigated for 'Islamic takeover' plot

Alleged coup to 'overthrow' teachers, governors.

Published 14 April 2014  |  

In an ever-growing scandal, 25 schools are now being investigated in an alleged Islamic plot to takeover Birmingham schools.

The investigation comes after over 200 complaints to the Birmingham City Council regarding the recently exposed "Operation Trojan Horse."

At the end of 2013, a letter was circulated outlining a "long-term plan and one which we are sure will lead to great success in taking over a number of schools and ensuring they are run on strict Islamic principles," according to The Guardian.

Dubbed "Operation Trojan Horse" in the letter, the five-step plan involved targeting schools with large Muslim populations, and turning parents against school leadership by telling them "that the school is corrupting their children with sex education, teaching about homosexuals, making their children pray Christian prayers and mixed swimming and sports."

The letter lists four schools that have already been successfully "turned": Adderley Primary, Saltley School, Park View School, and Regents Park Community Primary School.

Despite assertions that the letter was a hoax, the large number of complaints from current and former Birmingham school staff led Birmingham Councillor Sir Albert Bore to announce that a new chief advisor will manage the grievances.

"It's about the day-to-day practices in schools we're concerned about, it's also the impact these allegations are having on community cohesion in Birmingham," Bore told Sky News.

"Certainly there is a feeling amongst the Muslim community in Birmingham that there is a 'hue and cry' on at the present moment in time, we have to be concerned about that, just as we're concerned about what is actually happening in the schools themselves."

British Muslim leaders have also expressed concern in the effect "Operation Trojan Horse" has had on the community.

"The contents of this document are very disturbing," Muslims4UK Chairman Inayat Bunglawala told The Guardian.

"On the face of it this would appear to be part of a radical agenda by a tiny yet highly committed group of activists to impose their very conservative and bleak vision of Islamic teachings in our schools by fomenting division and distrust against the existing school leadership. It constitutes highly objectionable and unethical behaviour."

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