XXX Church warns parents against giving their children smartphones

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In this age of modern technology, it's only normal for parents to lavish their children with the best smartphones and tablets. But XXX Church, an online ministry dedicated to helping porn and sex addicts, is strongly advising parents not to let their children have free rein on these devices.

"Tech Culture is moving so fast that it's difficult to find any longitudinal studies about smartphones and social media on a developing mind. In other words, we don't know how our current tech is affecting an entire generation of people. We simply don't know yet," J.S. Park writes on the ministry's website.

It's true that smartphones can help children gain more knowledge, but on the flip side, they can also access things that might let them spiral out of control. So Park suggests that parents moderate their children's smartphone use at all times.

"The solution isn't necessarily to ban tech from the home, but to have wisdom and conversations in how we approach each device as they come. This isn't just dialogue about pornography, which is empirically harmful, or distractions, which are socially toxic. It's about how tech can be safely used and reasonably discussed within today's family," he explains.

With no parental guidance on smartphone use, Park says children might grow up missing true intimacy. They will feel "dumber" when it comes to engaging with other people, since they're more used to interacting with gadgets rather than their peers.

"Whenever I see a dinner table or a car full of people who are on their phones, I have to wonder why they're even with each other," says Park. "I'm not saying we need to throw away our laptops or to ride our bikes to work. I'm also not saying a terribly new thing here, but our disembodiment has become such a hindrance to communication that even bars are serving mugs that require you to get off your phone."

Also, Park says being addicted to smartphones disables people from living in the moment. Because people like to record big events then sharing them on social media, they're only experiencing things second-hand.

"Children need to enjoy their earliest moments without the added drive to record [them] and post [them]. Some moments are too sacred to be squeezed into a phone. They need to be lived, and alive, in and of themselves," says Park.

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