Trump revives summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un

[REUTERS/Leah Millis]U.S. President Donald Trump talks with the media as U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo looks on after a meeting with North Korea's envoy Kim Yong Chol at the White House in Washington, U.S., June 1, 2018.

U.S. President Donald Trump, in a complete reversal, said on Friday he would hold a summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un on June 12 in Singapore in the latest twist in the high-stakes diplomacy over eliminating Pyonyang's nuclear arms programme.

Eight days after cancelling the unprecedented summit, citing Pyongyang's "open hostility," Trump welcomed North Korea's former intelligence chief, currently under punitive U.S. sanctions, to the White House Oval Office, afterward exchanging smiles and handshakes, patting his arm in a friendly gesture.

"Good meeting today. I think it's a great start," Trump said after conferring for about 90 minutes with Kim Yong Chol, who became the first North Korean official to visit the White House in 18 years and who the U.S. president called "the second most powerful man in North Korea."

Trump said he expected an eventual "very positive result" with North Korea but dampened expectations for a breakthrough in Singapore.

"We're not going to go in and sign something on June 12th, and we never were," Trump told reporters on the White House lawn. "We're going to start a process. And I told them today, 'Take your time, we can go fast, we can go slowly,' but I think they'd like to see something happen."

Trump said it could take several meetings to reach an agreement, but he was convinced that Kim Jong Un was committed to denuclearisation. "He'd like to see it happen," Trump said.

It was an extraordinary change in tone from a president who last year threatened to rain "fire and fury like the world has never seen" on North Korea because of the threat its nuclear weapons and missiles posed to the United States.

Trump even backed away from the words "maximum pressure" that his administration had used to describe its approach to North Korea, combining the toughest-ever U.S. and international economic sanctions with diplomatic actions and the Republican president's military threats and preparations.

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