These city women took a Bible into their local brothel. What happened next?

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When the authorities in this city in Australia decided to allow a brothel, the Christians came out in protest.

They organised petitions, marches, articles in local newspapers.

Nothing worked. The brothel opened on schedule.

And then miracles began to happen.

Because instead of fighitng it, the Christian women of Toowoomba began going into the brothel to bring them the message of God's love.

Before long, these women began leaving prostitution and starting new lives of their own accord – starting with the brothel manager, Nola.

The remarkable story of the change effected by the City Women of Toowoomba was told by Letitia Shelton at Movement Day in London, a gathering of Christian leaders from towns and cities throughout the UK, aimed at trasformation though united action across denominatonal divisions.

Letitia said the aim of the campaign was to see their city free of porn.

The women's ministry goes into brothels and strip clubs.

She said: 'A few years ago our city decided it would be a good thing if our city had a brothel. Christians came together, we did petitions and a protest, but all to no avail. Still they opened a brothel.'

So the next thing they decided was to send in a team.

'We found a local woman, Ros, who had a heart for protsttutes. She started going into the brothel, building relationships, before it even opened. Then a woman called Jess took over. She built relationships to the point that last year, she bought a Bible for the brothel.

'She gave them the Bible. The girls started reading it. The manager, Nola, started asking questons. We could see this growing hunger in her life.'

In March this year, Letitia did a city breakfast and instead of inviting the local pastor's wife to speak, decided to invite Nola, the brothel manager. 'She came straight to breakfast in her work clothes. She said before you women draw down fire from heaven on me, I want to share my life with you.'

She spoke of her incredibly deprived background, her extraordinary struggle to survivie, and how she had to go into prostitution just to find a way to earn a living.'

Letitia said: 'Something powerful happened in that room that morning. We said to Nola, you belong to us. Jesus wants you.

'She ended up giving her life to Jesus a couple of months after that. Then she got fired from the brothel – not for being a Christian, fof another reason.'

A local Christian radio offered to employ her and she now works on the front desk. This year we've seen six women come out of the brothel,' said Letitia. For every woman that comes out, Letitia and her organisation try and raise $3,500 to help them transition into another job and to survive.

The concept of Movement Day began in New York seven years ago and has now spilled out across Asia and Europe. This was the first in the UK but there are likely to be regional events moving forward, with another big conference in two years. Tomorrow, professionals from across the law, media and educational arenas will join together and consult on how to work together to aid transformation at the grass roots.

One of the organisers, Steve Cox, said: 'This is not just an event. It is building relationships over a long time. We are looking at the next 30 years.' 

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