Donald Trump's faith advisers criticize him privately not publicly, says Johnnie Moore

Best-selling author Johnnie Moore has revealed in a recent panel discussion that the current administration's faith advisers have not refrained from criticizing President Donald Trump as some have claimed, but rather he indicated that such criticism is made in private and not simply for the mainstream media.

During a discussion on the "Role of Religion in the Republican Party" at Geogetown University in Washington, D.C. recently, Moore explained the role of Trump's evangelical advisers in the White House.

Johnnie Moore is seen in a screen capture of a video released by Rock Church.YouTube/Rock Church

When asked why so many evangelical voters supported Trump in the last election, the evangelical author explained that Christian voters were faced with the choice of supporting the Republican nominee or the Democrat Hillary Clinton, who was endorsed by Planned Parenthood.

He went on to point out that Trump was regarded as an "outsider" by evangelicals who always felt like outsiders in the Republican Party.

Moore, who played a large part in the creation of an evangelical advisory committee for Trump during the campaign, explained that the business mogul had contacted him to form the group to advise the campaign, but its members were not required to endorse the then-presidential candidate.

The author then recounted that the evangelical advisers were allowed to take part in a call with Trump "every single Monday."

Trump's evangelical supporters have drawn criticism for allegedly ignoring scandals involving the president, including his statements on immigrants and women, as well as allegations about an affair with porn star Stormy Daniels.

Moore, however, countered that evangelical leaders have not been afraid to criticize Trump, even if their criticism has not been reported in the media.

"By the way, it is not that this community doesn't criticize him. The Bible tells me that 'Faithful are the words of a friend.' That doesn't say that it has to be in bold 32-point font on the front page of the New York Times," the author contended.

Moore asserted that the situation in the U.S. today has led to an "unlikely alliance" between evangelicals and the current administration.

"There was a lot of pessimism about how that alliance would play itself out. But what has happened is we found that again and again and again, there is this strange politician that generally has kept his promises to our community, which is an unusual characteristic for a politician," the author said.

Moore, who also serves as the president of Kairos Company, was recently appointed by Trump to the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom (USCIRF), an independent government body that is tasked with protecting religious liberty abroad.