Church primary school bans 'extremist' Christian group

A Church primary school has banned an 'extremist' Christian group after complaints that children were left distressed by comments about gay marriage and a physical demonstration of God's power.

Dan Turvey, headmaster of St John's Church of Primary School in Tunbridge Wells, hit out at what he called a campaign by parents but said he would no longer invite the charity CrossTeach to take assemblies and lessons.

GoogleHeadteacher Dan Turvey at the parents' 'campaign' to ban CrossTeach

One parent said children were being told 'they would not go to a good place when they died' if they did not believe in God, according to the Telegraph, and another said her son had been told 'men can't marry men', according to the Guardian.

The parents group said in a statement: 'We recognise and respect the school's Christian values but think there is a brand of Christianity that is abusing that respect. The basis of [our] complaint relates purely to concerns over the welfare and safeguarding of children who we believe are being exposed to potentially damaging ideology.'

In a letter to parents on Monday Turvey said he was 'deeply saddened' to be severing ties but acknowledged children had been 'upset and disturbed emotionally'.

He wrote: 'After careful consideration I have decided that we will end our regular commitment to CrossTeach and that they will no longer lead assemblies or take lessons.'

But he added: I do not believe CrossTeach has done anything wrong.'

He said the group would continue to run a voluntary after school club. 'They do not deserve the tarnishing of their good name and allegations of extremism that have taken place over the last few months,' he told parents.

One parents who asked not to be named said: 'I didn't pull my mine out because overall I think it would do more harm than good to segregate them.

'But I do know some of the children have been upset by what they have heard. No one minds Nativity plays and Bible stories but considering most of the parents at the school aren't practising Christians I think the feeling is that it's all too much.

'In Tunbridge Wells the vast majority of primary schools are affiliated with the church so it's not like you have a choice whether you expose your children to this.

'Personally I want my children to learn about all religions. If you want them to be raised as Christians there are plenty of Sunday schools.'

But Turvey hit back at the parents' complaints and said: 'It is my view that the use of social media can be destructive and counterproductive. In this case I believe that the damage caused by the use of this media will take a very long time to repair.'

He added 'relationships have been soured and trust eroded', telling parents 'the past few months have been stressful, tiring and a distraction from our focus'.

Wayne Harris, Crossteach National Director, thanked Turvey for his 'strong comments' but added he was 'very disappointed' that the 16 years-long arrangement with the school would end.

'Wherever possible we work in partnership with local churches and we reflect their teaching, always aiming to be sensitive to the local context, and recognising that churches vary. We teach mainstream Christianity,' he said.

'In 16 years of Christian schools work no teacher has ever raised a concern that something has been said that could be interpreted as in any way 'hateful' or 'extremist' and we strongly refute this current parental allegation. On the contrary, schools have consistently expressed appreciation for the contribution that Crossteach has made and for the quality of the work.'

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