McCartney son BBC [VIDEO]: James McCartney's awkward interview dubbed "car crash"

Published 26 June 2013  |  
James McCartney/ BBC video screenshot

James McCartney, son of legendary Beatles member Paul McCartney, has released his first full album and is currently busy with press tours promoting his new work.

James appeared on BBC's morning show "BBC Breakfast" Tuesday morning but his on-air interview is not being described as a "car crash."

The interview turned awkward for the show's hosts when James turned out to be very quiet throughout his brief appearance.

Viewers were surely uncomfortable as they watched hosts Bill Turnbull and Susanna Reid ask the 35-year-old some questions about his tours and new album.

They talked about James' US tour, with Turnbull saying that it "sounds pretty tiring." James simply replied "Yeah" before saying, "No it was OK. It was good fun."

When the hosts then asked if it was a prerequisite to play "all sorts of different instruments" when being a member of the famous McCartney family, he replied, "Is it? Not really. But for me it is.. No, I don't know." Though James was on the show to promote his album, he seemed to have shown no real enthusiasm for doing so.

Fans reacted to James' interview on Twitter, with some calling it very painful and "excruciating" to watch.

James released his album in the hopes of following his legendary father Paul McCartney's footsteps. When asked by Rolling Stone in an April interview whether he's continuing a tradition, he answered: "I think it's a bit of both. That's very well put. Mainly its a tradition, but it's a part of my Dharma, which I go on a lot about because it's interested in self-realization and one's soul. It's a tradition but it's also me doing my own thing. It's part of what I do, what I enjoy. Picking up a guitar – I couldn't imagine doing anything else. But I paint and draw and do all that stuff, which is fun – I'm more interested in photography at the moment, capturing that image."

Watch James McCartney's awkward interview with BBC below:

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