Heated arguments between couples over the temperature at home

Published 14 November 2013  |  
(Photo: Martin Boulanger)

If you've ever found yourself wearing every jumper you own, looking alarmingly like a festive version of the Michelin Man and turning up the thermostat when your other half leaves the house, you are not alone.

In 2011, a team of researchers led by physician Han Kim discovered that on average, women's hands are almost three degrees colder than men's.

Apparently, the female body produces a slightly higher core temperature around the vital organs, which means that the hands and feet suffer lower temperatures, which in turn gives rise to the sensation of the entire body feeling cooler.

It may not all be in girls' minds after all but that doesn't mean it'll be any easier to convince their more cold-immune male friends of that.

A new survey undertaken by Anglican Home Improvements (AHI) has found that the temperature at home is a real source of contention for couples.

Sixty per cent of couples admitted that they argue over the cost of heating. Half the number of women questioned said that they feel the cold easily, while almost 40% of men claimed they are generally at a comfortable temperature.

The research revealed that four in ten couples argue over heating more than anything else, and it is the cause of at least three rows a week in most relationships.

 "These results tie in with the feedback we get from our customers...we find that women often focus on comfort and being warm while men are more concerned about the energy bills," Head of Marketing and Communications at AHI Melanie McDonald commented .

The rising cost of energy seems to permanently be in the news, as prices increase in the UK year on year. And unfortunately for us all, there are no signs of it slowing down any time soon, either, so arguments about bills are unlikely to become a thing of the past.

For the sake of peace at home, you may just want to make sure you're wearing a jumper first, before you ask to turn the heating up.

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