Acceptance to Civil Partnership Bill remains ambiguous

Published 29 March 2004  |  
After some of the states in U.S. had passed its green light to the legalization of gay marriage, today the homosexuals in United Kingdom are also cheered up to shout for their right.

The Civil Partnership bill is expected to be published on this Wednesday. It was first introduced through a consultation paper last year, setting the ball rolling towards equal rights for same-sex couples.

Attempting to show it still has a radical edge, the Government will say that all couples who sign up to a committed relationship should have the same rights, regardless of sexual orientation.

On Monday, the conservatives will hold their first every ¡§gay summit¡¨ and will demand that the Government go even further.

Though, on the eve of the party¡¦s ¡§gay summit¡¨, where it hopes to reinvent itself as welcoming to the lesbian and gay community, Andre Walker, an aide to party vice chairman Andrew Rosindell said that gay unions were "deeply offensive to religious people" and that they should be "tolerated but not encouraged".

"I'm sorry if that offends people but sooner or later that was going to come through," The Sunday Times reports Walker as saying.

"The fact is that the summit is the start of a journey for the party [to be liberal in the homosexual issue] rather than a conclusion," said an officer of the party.

Even though the government appears to have more opened attitude towards gay right, the confrontation between ethic issue and homosexuality is a big controversial issue.

Under the Civil Partnerships Bill, same-sex couples will be able to sign a register held by the register office in a procedure similar to a marriage. Couples who want to register will not have to go through an official ceremony, although local authorities will be allowed to decide how best to handle such ceremonies. In case the couples want to break up the relationship, they will have to dissolve the ¡§contract¡¨ of marriage formally through the courts.

Couples will also have rights to pensions similar to married couples, will not have to pay inheritance tax on property passed between them when one dies and will have access to hospital records similar to that allowed for a spouse.

In case the couples want to break up the relationship, they will have to dissolve the “contract?of marriage formally through the courts.

Couples will also have rights to pensions similar to married couples, will not have to pay inheritance tax on property passed between them when one dies and will have access to hospital records similar to that allowed for a spouse.

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